Elizabeth of York

Elizabeth of York was already Queen Regnant when she married Henry VII. They ended the Wars of the Roses and founded the Tudor dynasty. She was known as “one of the most gracious and best-beloved princesses in the world” despite not taking an active role in politics. Elizabeth was an embodiment of all the admired…

The Princes In The Tower: The Mystery Surrounding Edward IV’s Sons

Edward V and his brother Richard, Duke of York, are best-known in history as “the Princes in the Tower” since the 15th Century. Their deaths still remain a great mystery. Twelve-year-old Edward V was proclaimed King on 11 April 1483, two days after his father’s death. Edward IV died unexpectedly after he caught a chill…

Elizabeth II: Heir-Presumptive

Princess Elizabeth was suddenly thrust into the spotlight as Heir-Presumptive when her father was crowned George VI. However, Elizabeth's life changed after her beloved grandfather died in 1936, as her uncle Edward VIII abdicated the throne less than a year later. Many people, including Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin visited 145 Piccadilly to discuss the Constitutional…

Australia’s Role in the Abdication Crisis: Edward VIII Gave up Throne for Mrs Simpson

The Australian Government also insisted Edward VIII abdicated rather than marry American divorcee Wallis Simpson. Edward VIII became King of Great Britain on 20 January 1936 when his father George V died. He was determined to marry his mistress, Mrs Wallis Simpson, and told Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin on 16 November. Baldwin was horrified. Mrs…

The Duke and Duchess of York’s 1927 Australian Visit

The Australian Government invited the Duke and Duchess of York for the opening of Parliament House, Canberra, as part of a gruelling and exhausting tour. Albert Duke of York (George VI) and the Duchess of York (Queen Elizabeth) were also representing Britain and its Empire’s trading interests, so their visit was of great importance to…

Anzac Day: War, Women and the Queen Mother

Anzac Day is not just about the men who fought for our country, but also the women who did their bit during World War I. I write this article in response to a rant written for The Stately Harold by 20-year-old feminist Cassidy Boon who claims Anzac Day is “sexist” and there is “no mention of…